Being Busy, Daily Practice, and 750 Words

Sometimes I get “so busy” that I forget my own personal goals or habits. I’ll look back and realize I haven’t read a book in months, or I haven’t been to the gym in a couple of weeks.

For me, my personal goals are simple and straight forward, its really the habits I want to build and foster, which there are really 4:

1. Read everyday 
(Always be reading a book. I’m trying to mix in more fiction – I’ve always been a big non-fiction reader, ie: authors like Malcolm Gladwell or Michael Lewis)

2. Write everyday
(I try to have a goal to write ‘Morning Pages’ every morning. 3 pages, stream of consciousness, popularized by Julia Cameron in her book, The Artist’s Way. But, I don’t always do it.)

3. Exercise 
(Mainly Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, with occasional yoga to supplement BJJ for flexibility and injuries)

4. Study something
(Whether it’s Mandarin Chinese, coding Python or Swift, or just some random history or philosophy class from HarvardX, I try to always have one skill or something to be working on)

On the writing goal, I just recently found out about this website called 750words. Apparently 750 words = 3 pages. So, it’s just an environment to actually do the ‘Morning Pages’ in. I tried it this morning. What’s cool about is the stats it gives you about your writing as soon as your finished. http://750words.com/entries/share/4970544

It only took me 12 minutes. I really should do this more often.

I’m Going to Start Writing Again [The Comeback of My Blog]

There’s a been a lull in my writing. A long one.

In 2014, I just didn’t write much at all.

Partly this is justifiable, but also maybe partly it isn’t.

The reason why it is a bit justifiable is the same reason I would stop reading English books for a bit: to focus on things. Namely studying Chinese, training Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, or working and making money.

Priorities are always flip flopping around in life. But, to some extent I’m cool with that. I’m cool with riding a bit of a wave on certain priorities. I’m busy with work this month, then I’m busy with work this month. If I’m not so busy with work, maybe I’m in the gym everyday, training.

While I am cool with these priorities flopping around a bit, I do to some extent wish I was a bit more consistent with things. I don’t really wish I was a robot, but I do wish I was pushing some things out on a more consistent basis.

I’ll use training as an example: going to the gym everyday for a month and then taking the next month off vs. going three days a week consistently for 2 months. Which is better?

Theoretically, I don’t really know. And, personally, I’m cool with, or I want to be cool with to some extent, the former – going everyday for a month, and then chilling for a month. Why? Because it allows for intense focus, and then in the off-time it allows for a focus on something else.

But, there’s also a lot to be said for the later. Going consistently for 2 months certainly does more for building up a habit. It’s not yet quite as automatically as brushing your teeth before bed, but there is something to say about habits that they take less mental focus (i.e.: less decision-making: going to the gym is something I do on these days, therefore it gets done and I’m there before I know it. There’s no internal debate about whether to go or not go going on.) And this is really what a lot of the goals boil down to with habit-building. This is why its nice to have a nice routine.

But, its also nice to shake things up. To break from the routine once in awhile.

There’s no perfect answer to life. There’s no straight line to success.

It looks more like this:

Success

So. I want to write again. Think again. Pretend to be an intellectual. Flesh out my thoughts. Something like that.

Should I write daily? I should. Should I do BJJ daily? I should. Should I study Chinese daily? I should. Should I work everyday so that I have money to do things I want to do? I should.

And, the list builds up again. There’s not enough time in the day for it all. So, I ride the waves. The ebbs and flows.

I do want to be more consistent though.

So, I’m going to write again.

No More Goals

I Quit: No More Goals

Brighton UK

Take life one day at a time…

I used to always be in a rush.

I had to graduate college in 4 years (I even picked a major I didn’t care about and went to Summer school a bit to make that happen), I had to put out a CD by X date, I had to be a profitable trader within 6 months, I had to go to a 1 year MBA program – because 2 years was just way to long, and I had to go NOW, I couldn’t put it off for another year.. I wanted to be a millionaire by 30, etc, etc. All of these time constraints and goals on everything…

We’re told growing up, or at least led to believe, that you grow up, you turn 18, go to college, graduate in 4 years and then get a job… and then you’re done. You’re grown up now. Or maybe, it’s get a spouse, a house, a few kids… now you’re done.. now you’re grown. Like that’s a goal… we just want to grow up, in a race to grow up before X date….

Why though? Does growth stop at 18? at 25? No? Maybe at 30?

My thinking has slowly started to evolve on this. When we’re young, we look forward to these ages 18, 30, like everything stops at that point. We can’t see past that. But, really there is no rush.

I started to realize this when I would meet with professionals in Singapore, people who had lived all around the world, in the midsts of their careers, marketing managers and MDs, CEOs, and managing partners at consulting firms, and they would give me career advice, they would tell me: “Your career is a long road. You’re still young, you have plenty of time to make mistakes…” Man, what are you talking about? I’m still young? You don’t even know how old I am! I was 26 then. I thought I was old. I wasn’t some 22 year old college grad any more…

Or maybe its some of the books I’ve read lately that have changed my thinking and long-term perspective: Radical Honesty: “everything is futile”; George Valiant’s work around adult development and the Harvard Grant studies: “Why is it we know so much about childhood development, but hardly anything about adult development? Does development stop once you hit adulthood?” The answer is a resounding “NO” by the way; Ramit Sethi’s I Will Teach You to Be Rich: short-term saving plans, long-term investing, “just get started”, what you do doesn’t matter so much, 85% of it is just getting started.

But… really I think it was the last 8.5 months I spent in Taiwan: where I started to really take studying Chinese and training Brazilian Jiu Jitsu seriously. And, I had to give up goals, because I couldn’t see them. It was just too far out, too impossible to predict. In order to take these things seriously, you just have to imbed them into your life, make them a part of your everyday. What am I supposed to say? “I’m going to be fluent in X amount of months/years”? But actually what does “fluency” even mean? I’m fluent in English and I’m currently in the UK and I don’t understand what the British are talking about approximately 20-30% of the time. And, once you reach “fluency”, then what? You stop with Chinese? Because, you’re done? Or, for BJJ “I’m going to be a blackbelt in X number of years” Man, who can predict that? It may take 7 years, it might take 20. What if you get an injury?  What does it even matter? Oh, and when you get a blackbelt, then what? That’s the goal. Now you’re done, you can stop training. Plus, when you start to take up these long endeavours like BJJ or Mandarin Chinese, you realize this whole “I’m going achieve X by date Y” is so laughable that only complete newbs really say things like this.

I’m trying to wean myself away from goals.

Not just in BJJ or Mandarin, but in everything: career, finances,…. Life.

But, that doesn’t mean I’m not still working at all of them everyday.

You get better at something through constant work, constant reassessment, constant refocus.

In fact, I’m probably working more at all of it now, because I’m learning to enjoy and experience the pursuit and process. Not chasing some end goal.

Pursuit and process.

“Goals are for losers.” – Scott Adams

 

From Groundhogs Day to Constant Flux; And 2014 Resolutions

In October, I was a robot.

I was focused on building two new habits: training BJJ, and studying Mandarin Chinese. While continuing to read everyday.

I did all three of them… almost everyday in October.

I was settled in Taipei, and I was grinding. Day in. Day out. The same thing.

Every day is the same day

Every day is the same day

Then, November came and everything changed.

November started off with a visa run out of Taipei: one week in Bangkok and one week in Manila.

Quick backstory on Bangkok, because I think it’s funny:

In November 2012, I was in Malaysia with plans to head up to Bangkok by train. I paid for an apartment in Bangkok for two weeks and had everything planned. Then, at the last minute, I cancelled the trip, saying “two weeks in Bangkok isn’t enough. I’ll have to go back there early next year when I can spend more time there.” And, I flew straight to Tokyo. Of course… I never made it to Bangkok in early 2013. Actually, it took a whole year before I finally made it there: November again. 2013. This time, I only spent one week there.

Funny how things change.

Bangkok

Bangkok, November 2013

Anyway, back on topic.

In addition to the two-week trip to start off November, work picked up, and I started an online course at HarvardX on the history of China.

Now, plenty of more things occupied my time.

Needless to say, in the first two weeks of November, I didn’t study Chinese or make it to BJJ at all. (I did still read everyday though – that’s easy to do while traveling)

I even took my gi with me, with plans to hit a BJJ gym in Manila. But, I never made it out there. Too busy.

Funny how things change.

Now, I’ve been back in Taipei for about a month, and I’ve been trying to get back to habits of Mandarin and BJJ daily. The Mandarin I’ve done well with. BJJ has been more difficult, with both the additional work schedule and I’ve encountered a nagging shoulder injury all month. It’s been annoying.

Because, of the shoulder injury, I’ve added a new daily habit into the mix: 10 minutes of Yoga every morning. It’s actually really helped my nagging shoulder and neck problems. But, I’m still not 100%.

Actually, the Yoga habit was one I started in Tokyo, but fell out of touch with once I moved back to Taipei.

I think its a good one to have, so it’s back in the mix.

Also, I’ve decided to drop reading as a daily habit in favor of studying more Chinese. (i.e.: read Chinese textbooks on the MRT to practice reading Chinese characters, rather than reading books in English).

So, I definitely won’t hit the 30 books in 6 months target.

So, right now the three habits I’m trying to do daily are: Yoga, BJJ, and studying Mandarin.

Add in work and social activities, and my time is well accounted for.

Yet, I’m still trying to do more.

There’s a couple more habits on my radar:

    • I want to beef up my consulting grind a bit, so I need to get on that, and I think the first step to get back into consulting mode is to get back to practicing case interviews: hypothesizing, synthesizing and drilling down on client’s issues in a very timely manner. Therefore, I want to get into the habit of practicing case interviews on a daily basis again. This was a habit I had over a year ago: when I lived in Singapore I would practice cases on Skype everyday until I was good enough to run rings around the Ivy league students, but now, I’m rusty again. So, I need to get back into this habit. I think it’s just something that will help me overall in my business career.

 

    • In order to take steps to get to the next level in Mandarin, I need to really start doing language exchanges daily. These are troublesome, because they take so much time: generally two hours. One hour to speak English, one hour to speak your target language. But, I did this in Japan and it did wonders for my Japanese conversational ability – a mark I’m still fairly far off in Mandarin. Also, I’ve had more trouble finding good language exchange partners in Taipei, I tend to run into two kinds of language exchange partners: the ones who just want to just teach you random vocabulary words in Mandarin (which is not helpful at all, because a language is so much more than vocabulary) or girls who are just looking for foreign boyfriends and use language exchange as a means to find one. In this respect, I really miss Tokyo – the Japanese took their language exchange efforts seriously.

 

    • Also, I want to beef up the work out regimen. I would like to get back into the weight room and start to slowly pick up Muy Thai. My ideas for this are to basically start off with a training split of BJJ 6 days a week, Muy Thai 1 (yeah, I said, slowly – and my focus is still much more leaned to BJJ). Also, my goals for the weight room would to just get back to building strength: I wouldn’t do too much here, just a Starting Strength sort of program, focused really around bench press, dead lifts, and squats – maybe 3 days a week.

These habits are just goals right now, and nothing I’m putting much effort to building right away, but rather I’d like to add them in slowly. Maybe, one habit a month? Or something along those lines.

No New Year’s Resolutions or anything like that, because I don’t do such things. I’m more focused on building habits slowly, and changing things and adjusting always and as needed.

Cheers!

Have a good 2014 folks.

happy_new_year_2014_266948

Avoid These Mistakes… Actually, On Second Thought, Don’t Avoid Them

As much as I read articles and blogposts on the internet, there’s one particular type of post of that I refuse to read: the classic, and all too common “avoid these mistakes” post.

Because, I don’t like people telling me what not to do, and I don’t like focusing on the negative.

If you tell me not to do something, I’ll do it just to spite you. Don’t tell me what not to do.

Who are you anyway?

I understand most people do try to write such posts to be informative, perhaps even helpful. But, they are being informative in a negative way: informing out of fear. Fear of failure and fear making mistakes.

I don’t like that. So I refuse to read it.

I refuse to associate with it. Avoid these mistakes? Why? What if I don’t?

What if I read your article and then I go and make the mistake that you just told me not to make?

Then I feel stupid. Thank you, you made feel stupid.

I don’t like feeling stupid.

I get it, I get it. You probably meant it in a helpful way. But, you framed it negatively. With negative words, like: “don’t” and “mistakes”.

Neither of those words sound fun to me.

Maybe you had good intentions. Maybe, these are mistakes you made and you learned from them – that’s cool. That’s good material actually. Please tell me about it. Please tell me what you learned.

I love to hear what other people learned, that way I can learn to. If this is your intent, then please do, but do it right. I’d love to hear how you fucked up and learned from it. But, don’t tell me not to make the same mistakes.

Tell me what you learned from them, so I can learn too. Then, if when I do the same mistake, the lesson will be instant: I can instantly process it, because I already know what you learned when you made the mistake.

Maybe they are just mistakes you’ve seen other people make. So, they are common mistakes. In that case, I’m probably going to make them anyway, even if I read your article and you told me “not to” make them. So, let me make them. Don’t tell me “not to” (or “don’t”).

Don’t try to rob me of my learning experiences. I very much like my mistakes. I need them. They are a part of me.

So, if you write a post or article titled: “7 Mistakes You Should Avoid When…[whatever]” I can guarantee you this: I won’t read it.

If you wanted me to – then you just made a mistake right there.

At the end of the day, your “Mistakes to avoid…” articles just read like rules to me. And if there’s any rule I’ve learned in life its this:

Rules are made to be broken.

Similarly, mistakes are meant to be made…

MISTAKE

Where’s the whiteout?

 

[randomtext category=”Post Sigs”]

Getting Out of The Loop: Hacking Productivity, Changing Habits, and Being AntiSocial

“These days, I make a huge mistake every day. I start off with the loop: e-mail, Twitter, Facebook, my Amazon rank, my blog stats, my blog comments. Claudia asks me, ‘Did you finish the loop yet?’ And I think it will only take a few seconds but it probably actually takes about twenty minutes. I probably do it ten times a day. That’s two hundred minutes! Three hours and twenty minutes! Ugh.”

That quote is from James Altucher in his new book Choose Yourself. But it could very well be from me.

Actually, these days my loop also includes reddit. So, it’s a little bit different than his.

And, if you use reddit, you know how dangerous having reddit in your loop can be. Sometimes you lose 2 hours. Not just 20 minutes.

Youtube is the same problem if you happen to get it stuck in your loop. Because they “recommend” another video. And then another video. It’s easy to get stuck there.

James is right. It always takes longer than I expect it to take. I always think its going to take mere seconds.

I’m just going to check Facebook to see if there are any messages or notifications. Okay, now I have to check email. Ok… now I have to check Twitter. Then, Reddit…

Then, sometimes I finish the loop and close the computer. And, I didn’t even look up or do whatever it is I opened the computer for.

I don’t remember until after I close it. Cuz I was stuck in the loop.

Then, I remember what I needed to do in the first place. So, I open the computer again. This time, fighting all urges to avoid the loop. To beat the habit.

Productivity 1

Productivity

Habit = Life on Auto-Pilot

That’s what the loop is. It has become. A habit.

The other day I heard someone say that a recent survey determined that 45% of college students’ daily behaviors are done out of habit.

That means only 55% of their daily activities are determined by actually thinking about them.

And these are college students. I imagine the ratio is even more skewed towards habit for corporate drones.

This isn’t necessarily bad. Some habits are good.

I can’t leave the house in the morning without taking a shower, brushing my teeth, or combing my hair.

I mean, I guess I could. I physically could leave the house without doing any of those things. But I would feel really awkward.

Habits ingrained into me by my parents and the society I grew up in.

Even at night it’s a similar story. I can’t go to sleep without brushing my teeth. Or it would feel really awkward.

Those are 27 year old habits now. That’s what normal is to me.

But, those are good habits to have. I have no interest in changing them.

When we were kids, my mom used to have a habit of picking us up from school and driving home.

Sometimes she would say something when she picked us up like, “I have to go to the grocery store before we go home.” I think it was just a warning or something. So we knew we weren’t going straight home. But then she’d keep driving, she’d be almost to our street, almost at our house before she remembered, “Damnit I was supposed to go the grocery store! What am I doing?” And then she’d turn the car around and go to the grocery store.

But going to the grocery store wasn’t the habit. It was the exception. Driving home was the habit. This was a break from the norm. So, it took a lot more conscious effort.

How Long Does It Take to Build or Break a Habit?

habit 2

Old Habit-Change- New Habit

There are all kinds of habits. For example: there’s eating habits.

Some people have bad eating habits. They eat nothing but junk and can’t seem to break it. Some people have good eating habits. I think I have fairly decent eating habits. I don’t eat much junk. I don’t really eat things with sugar in them. I can’t stand the taste of it anymore. Doing so would feel awkward and bad to me.

This wasn’t always the case. In late 2009 I reached a rather hefty 190 lbs. The next year I did P90X twice, back-to-back, and lost 45 lbs.

Part of doing P90X was being conscious about the food I was eating. So, for 180 days I made a very conscious effort to change my eating habits. To cut down on junk food. 180 days. That’s not a short time frame. That’s 180 days of hard work.

3 years later I still can’t really stand eating junk food and I make fairly unconscious decisions (without much effort) to go for more protein and less carbs in my meals on a daily basis. It’s fairly easy for me to do so. It’s habit now. It doesn’t take any effort. But, that wasn’t always the case.

There’s an old saying “it takes 21 days to make a habit”. Maneesh and Derek Johanson both reckon it takes a lot longer than that.

It depends on what the habit it is. And how hard it is for you to develop it. Different habits take different lengths of time to build.

But, if you really want to build a daily habit, forget all of your technology. Forget all of the iPhone apps. Just go with the Jerry Seinfeld trick.

I’m trying to get out of this social media loop habit.

I don’t really want to have to shell out $8/hr. for somebody to slap me.

I’ve found that it helps to write down what I’m doing to do. Pen and paper. I tend to write all of my daily to-do lists on pen and paper these days. As much as I love technology, I think more and more, I’m starting to move away from it. Sometimes, it’s just a distraction.

So, before I open my computer now. I grab a pen and paper and I write down why I am opening my computer. To look up what? To get what?

I write that down first. Then I open the computer. And I have the paper to look at – to remind me what I’m supposed to be doing.

That way I can try to avoid the loop.

Anti-social also helps. Maybe I should use it more.

 

—–

[For another good post on productivity and improvement, see my post: How I F–ed Up April; And What’s Next on My Plate]

[randomtext category=”Post Sigs”]

I Moved Out of Texas So I Could Read More (How to Read 30 Books in 6 Months)

 Don’t Know When I’ll Be Back Again…

Outta here…

A couple of years ago I made the decision to move away from the place where I’ve lived all of my life: Texas.

One of the main reasons I moved out was because I wanted to read more books.

I’m being serious.

Well, I felt like I was just wasting too much time driving. I know I was wasting too much time driving because I would put a CD in the deck and before the end of the day it would be back on track 1. Sometimes back on track 10.

I’m talking about 80 minute CDs here. This means I must’ve been spending like 100 minutes driving per day.

Way too much. For what? To turn a wheel around. To move my foot up and down between two peddles. How is any of this productive? How does it benefit me in the long run?

What else did I do while I was driving? Well, I would listen to music. Or I would think about things. Just flesh out ideas. Think and think and think.

I like doing both of those things. I like listening to music. I like thinking.

But, I don’t really need to drive to do either. I can do both of those just fine walking around aimlessly. Or sitting in a park.

I guess one benefit of driving is I could talk out loud to myself. But, I can also talk to myself while walking around aimlessly. Or even siting in a park. Passer-bys might think I’m crazy, but that’s okay. I used to do that in college too. My roommate back then once said he’d drive by sometimes and sees me walking around with headphones on and talking to myself. He said I was one of the few people who could get away with doing that, because people would see me and think, “oh, that’s just GP.” That’s what they used to call me back then: GP.

So I’ve been crazy. It’s okay.

Metros & Inspiration

I went to London a couple of years ago. I thought riding on the Tube was awesome.

Everybody I met in London complained about how bad the Tube was. But to me it was awesome. At least I didn’t have to drive.

I started to think about all the cool things I could do if I lived in a city with a good metro system (Americans call it a subway system). I could read more books. I could talk to random people.

I can’t do either of those when I’m driving.

I mean you can try. But, then you’re doing things like trying to get the girl next to you to write her phone number on the windshield before the traffic light turns red. Yeah, it’s not impossible. But, it’s logistically difficult.

So I sold my car and left Texas. I just didn’t want do drive anymore.

I wanted to read more. I wanted to talk to random people.

read more

Or he’ll eat you

So, I’ve spend the last two years living in cities. Big cities with metro systems. Cities where you can walk around a lot. And just explore random neighborhoods. Just wandering around random streets. I’ve never gone this way before… So then I go that way.

I’ve also been reading a lot more.

I started out reading on an iPad. Then an iPhone. I had a Kindle app. I didn’t understand why people would need a Kindle when there’s Kindle apps.

But, then I eventually did understand.

I got tired of reading on those things. So, I quit reading.

My eyes would hurt. My head would hurt.

The Need to De-Screen

Too much time on backlit screens. I would spend all day looking at a computer screen. Now, I’m spending my commute time looking at a screen too. Too much screen time.

I got sick of it. I wanted to de-screen.

When I was in Taiwan, one of my mates (he’s Australian, so I think the that’s right term) had a Kindle. I asked him about it.

Then, I read about Kindles. I looked into it. They are made to read like a book. Without bothering your eyes like a screen does. It’s not a backlit screen. It’s e-ink. But, I was in Taiwan and there’s no Amazon there. I guess because it’s not a real country. I don’t know. I didn’t know Amazon played by the UN’s rules. Actually, I don’t know what they do. How do people in Taiwan shop on Amazon? I still didn’t figure it out.

So, then I looked up Kindles in Japan. Japan has become my go-to place to buy new electronics, because everything is so cheap here. I don’t know why. Maybe because the Yen is falling to pieces. I don’t think that’s the whole story though. I don’t know why really. All I know is when I bought my MacBook in Japan it was $300 cheaper than they are in the US.

So, I looked up Kindles. The new Kindle Paperwhite was $120 in the US, but only $70 in Japan. So, I waited until I got back to Japan to get it.

Actually, I think the money I’ve saved on my MacBook and my Kindle has probably paid for my plane tickets to Japan. But then again everything else in Japan is twice as expensive, including food and transportation, so it probably doesn’t work out if you actually take into account everything and do the math. Ahh, well… forget your numbers.

“You can make numbers do anything you want them to do. Including make yourself sound like an idiot.”

By the way that quote is from Kobe Bryant, so I should credit him for it. I don’t even like Kobe Bryant, but that’s a great quote. It’s even better in context. The context is: Kobe was on a radio show talking about how good Larry Bird was and that people seem to have forgotten how good Larry Bird was. And, some guy tweeted something like “if you look at the numbers, Larry Bird wasn’t even that great of a shooter.”  See. I told you it was even better in context.

Anyway….

 The Goal: 30 Books in the Next 6 Months

read fast 4

Clockwork…

Since getting the Kindle I’ve definitely seen my reading go up. I’m finishing a book every couple of days now. And, I try to keep at least 5 unread books in waiting. That way as soon as I finish one, I can flip through and have a decent choice based on how am I’m feeling to determine what I read next.

I’m nowhere near Scott Young’s or Claire Diaz Oritz’s pace. I’ve only read about a dozen books in the past 9 months. But, that’s partly because I’ve still gone through 3-4 months periods without really reading much at all.

I’m actually starting to realize those kinds of numbers are possible.

For myself, I’m setting a goal to read 30 MORE books by the end of the year. Yeah, 30 books in 6 months is quite a jump from 12 in the past 9 months, but I’ve put some “hacks” in place to help me get there.

And, I know how to get there:

  • Keep my work locations and home location separate. Don’t work from home. Home is a place to relax. There’s an old saying “don’t shit where you eat” – rather vulgar, but it gets the point across. So, that means I have to have a daily commute. Commute on the metro everyday. This not much else to do on the metro but read, so this forces a good everyday reading habit. Especially now that I have a Kindle.
  • Spend weekends outdoors. I need to get away from the computer more. Get away from work more. And just overall relax more. One way to do that is to spend more days in the park on at the beach. Since I travel a lot there’s almost always a new park, a new beach, or even a new temple or something to explore. So, at least one day a week, I’m going to just leave my computer behind and head out with only my book and my camera. Relax and read.
  • Take advantage of reading time wherever and whenever. Another good thing about having a Kindle and having a daily reading habit as mentioned above is I’m going to wind up getting really into a book. And not want to set it down. If I take advantage of this by just dropping by a cafe and continuing to read when the mood strikes me, I’ll be able to chill there for a couple of hours. Then, I’ll really get through books in no time.

Yeah. 30 books in the next 6 months. I’m going to make it happen. Which means I’m also going to stay out of Texas.

child

Explore the world, travel and read…

[randomtext category=”Post Sigs”]